What Is A Good Safety Razor For A Beginner?

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What Is A Good Beginner Safety Razor?

what is a good safety razor for a beginner
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Oh, to be young again! Learning the art of shaving with a safety razor should be a highlight for all young adults.

A rite of passage!

After all, shaving may soon become a daily experience. Can a wet shave soon be an anticipated ritual? Indulgence in a few minutes of pampering? An art?

As with teaching and learning any new skill, it is best to prepare in advance. I didn’t drive until age 18, but you can bet I learned on a stick shift. It didn’t take long, but learning was performed with forethought and patience. Who knew I’d drive a cute MGB a few years later? Has a stick shift become something of a lost art? That would be sad. Yet, we do not forget; the skill is ingrained.

That’s true about the art of wet shaving. You don’t forget. But will the energized practice of wet shaving fade? It cannot because using a safety razor for shaving is just too cool, and it offers the closest shave ever.

Here is why you want to introduce a good safety razor for a beginner shaver.

What's Old Is New

the history of the razor

Watch any old western, the strong and handsome leading actors indulging in wet shaves led our grandfathers and then our own dads to follow. The vision brings memories of warm washcloths and steamy barbershops. And also great scents.

I’m reminded of my dad after he tossed away another electric shaver. He went old school; the entire family celebrated. It didn’t hurt that he looked like James Dean. But he left a scent in his wake that we kids thought was pretty cool. Very James Dean-ish, we decided.

There’s a renaissance happening with old school safety razors. And for good reason. Check some local barbershops, you’ll see those wet shavers are back. And why not? It’s like a spa treatment. That’s one reason females like a good safety razor, too.

A good safety razor for a beginner is a razor with strength. It stands up over time. Stainless steel is best because the material doesn’t rust. Stainless steel is also recyclable. More on that later.

What About The First Time User?

shave neck - the best way

But there’s no pivoting head. No guard to protect the young person learning to shave. Is that safe for a beginner? There are two schools of thought here.

One, if you’ve never used a pivoting head, you won’t miss it. You simply learn the art of using the proper angle for the job. A good wet razor shave is performed on an angle, usually around 30 degrees. But the face and neck have contours. and the blade must follow those contours carefully. Some think beginners can’t handle that task.

As for a lack of a guard on a wet shave razor, a beginner probably won’t miss it. The newbie  shaver soon learns the proper pressure and angles for his or her skin. It is a learning curve, and like shifting a car, safety razor shaving soon becomes second nature.

Some folks might argue the lack of a pivot or guard is just too dangerous for a beginner. That might be true for some beginners. They need coordination and a steady hand, patience. They might be cautioned to expect a few nicks.

But remember, using the best safety razor is way easier than, say, landing a rocket booster on a platform in the ocean. Shaving is pretty darn easy. It just takes practice.

The handle length of a safety razor can determine the success for beginning shavers. How? For the most part, a longer handle means less control and maneuverability. That’s not best for a beginner. So, is a short handle better? The shaver needs to feel a good sense of balance in the razor. A 3-inch handle is a good size. It follows contours really well. The shorter handle provides better control.

A beginner likes feeling in control.

Deciding On Your First Safety Razor

There is an economy in buying a safety razor with plenty of blades. Because a beginning shaver doesn’t experience quick hair growth—as opposed to the ‘five o’clock shadow shaver.’—you can expect a blade will last more than a week. Probably longer. For these reasons, there’s a couple of safety razors that stand out.

It’s a good bet these razors fit the beginner. I know Merkur 34C does! It’s just 3-inches long, and it weighs a perfect 78 grams. I like the non-slip handle. That is a good balance between weight and length, with more weight in the handle where it belongs. The balance means the shaver exerts less pressure. Less pressure translates to improved smoothness. A close shave!

Another razor I’d recommend is a bit pricier, but well worth it, especially for beginner shavers. It’s got six blade level setting options to ensure you get the closeness, smoothness, and comfort you want out of your shave. The weight of the safety razor will help glide the blade across your skin, preventing nicks, and skin irritation. That’s important for a beginner because younger shavers have delicate skin. Below are our shave club’s razor deals.

Closing Thoughts

Remember, a safety razor requires a wet shave. That’s part of its allure. So, do you use soap and water, shaving cream, a DIY concoction? That’s up to your beginner shaver. I’d recommend, however, against buying a shave cream at the local store. Why?

Some ingredients in a can from the store seem, well—-harsh:

  • BHT
  • Butane
  • Dimethicone PEG/PPG-20/23 benzoate
  • Laurel alcohol
  • POG-1-PEG-9 Laurel glycol ether
  • Propane
  • …and more.

Obviously, a beginner deserves better. Much better.

The beginner shaver might want try a boars hair shave brush (hands are for shaving not smearing) and shave soap. Lather it up (there’s a bowl for that), after wrapping or rinsing with warm water.

One last thought:

Our younger generation is a little freaked out by the state of our environment. Here’s a couple reasons beginner shavers should love wet shaving:

The environmentally-minded younger generation isn’t cool with what they’re getting.  And shaving systems do have environmental impact. Did you know, some 2 billion plastic razors are thrown away each year? Yes, those plastic disposable razors are convenient. But they’re an environmental disaster. The energy spent manufacturing the devices and the carbon dioxide emitted don’t help matters, either.

The site earth911 recommends we shave ‘old-school wet’ as an affordable, cleaner and closer shave. Another site, goingzerowaste, recommends safety razors, as well. Recyclable (made from stainless steel or chrome) is a boon for environmentalism.

And don’t forget to make a ‘blade bank’ for depositing used blades. Newbies can keep the bank in the medicine cabinet, right next to the witch hazel and unused lip balm—good for nicks!

Pamela Anderson

Pamela Anderson

Pamela, a So Cal native, is a teacher, freelance writer, swimmer and bicyclist, and is currently learning guitar.

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